Tag Archives: change

Around the web this week

A few things that have got me thinking and musing this week.

Justice and phones
What’s your phone got to do with a war?

Via Robin Peake

One of a few helpful pieces from Tearfund Rhythms on phones and conflict minerals. One of the reasons why I bought a Fairphone – topic of a future blog!

 

Football
Breaking news: Fifa say Hell will host 2026 World Cup

Via Gary Lineker

Great piece from the Telegraph on the farce that is FIFA.

 

Politics
Experiments show this is the best way to win campaigns. But is anyone actually doing it?

Via Tom Baker

From the US – What is the most effective form of political campaigning and why is it not used as it should be? I resonated with this in terms of my likelihood to vote for candidates I have the opportunity to engage with on the doorstep.

Thank heavens for Justin Welby

Via Pete Greig

How Lambeth Palace is worth listening to again and Justin Welby’s taking on of Wonga and payday loan companies by providing an alternative.

Sweden’s Prostitution Solution: Why Hasn’t Anyone Tried This Before?

How the Swedes have tackled traficking with incredible results.

 

Young people, riots and character
The New Politics of Character

Via Robin Peake

The results of a study into young people participating in riots in London revealed that the key factor was not lack of money or lack of morality but lack of character. What follows is an interesting discussion on defining and developing character in young people.

Cities
For the sake of our cities, it’s time to make town planning cool again

On the need for visionary planner more passionate about flourishing than bowing to the whims of developers.

Leadership, change and church
“The Top Ten Reasons This will Never Work”: On Leading Change in the Church

Via David Fitch

Despite my not being a fan of numbered lists there is some helpful stuff in here on  leading change in churches and some of the many objections…

A quote

And finally a couple of tunes for the weekend…

Leonard Cohen – Did I Ever Love You?

And Springsteen from Dublin back in 2006 – When the Saints Go Marching In

 

 

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Neknominations, Shane Claiborne and Creative Alternatives

#neknominations have been big news in Ireland over the past week. Two people have died in stunts related to this social media craze. Even a judge in Northern Ireland has been caught up in the media storm. There’s much that could be said about drinking culture in Ireland. As a (youth) leader I am only too aware of how my actions (whether I like it or not) influence others and my responsibility as some sort of role model.

My initial reaction to some of it was righteous indignation and to be dismissive of people (some of my friends) who in my mind were being irresponsible. The red mist descended and I saw all the reasons (in my mind) why they were wrong/stupid and I was superior.

On Saturday I was at the justice and mercy themed Rubicon (which was excellent, stimulating and inspiring). I loved the mixture of presenters – a mother and daughter who run Rathmines women’s refuge, John who may well one day run Google, Graham from Solas Project (where my wife works), Shane Claiborne, a wonderfully diverse panel and a couple of Archbishops and many more.

Shane Claiborne told a wonderful story about creatively challenging unjust laws banning the feeding of the homeless in public. His church then held communion in the park which turned into a banquet (well pizza anyway) for all there (including many homeless people). As these church members and leaders were arrested the ridiculousness of the situation highlighted the injustice of the laws. Much in the way MLK did in the civil rights movement.

His line that we need to be creative in overcoming injustice stuck with me.

A day or two later it resurfaced in the whole neknomination thing.

I’m sure most of you may have seen this. Brent Lindeque changed the story. Without condemnation.

Which morphed into raknomination – instead of necking a pint instead carry out a random act of kindness.

My initial reaction was one of condemnation. Of red mist. Of  listing all the reasons why it wasn’t a good idea. I imagine we all do it. It may be justified but it’s also lazy.

What chance did my approach have of convincing someone of the lack of merit of neknominations? What was needed was a game changer. A positive alternative.

Too often I (and we as wider society) see things too starkly. We accept or reject. And there is a logjam.

If we want to see change in hearts, minds and on a larger scale in society often the best way is not to argue the opposite viewpoint, but to find a creative alternative that sneaks around the corner and blindsides us.

Change for the better requires the hard work of forming creative alternatives.

[Up next a few friends who came up with a creative way to highlight the ethics behind the garment industry]